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Concurrent Custody in Florida

Even among caring and able parents who offer nothing but the best for their child, there comes a time in life they may seek help from a relative or another person to help take care of the child. In many cases, this may be as simple as asking a relative to take care of the child for a short period of time, or in other cases, it may be for a longer period. In either case, it is important to have a Brandon child custody attorney assisting with the matter.

When Is Concurrent or Temporary Custody Necessary?

Florida law recognizes the need for a parent to have an extended family member or members to provide help in taking care of their child. The law also recognizes it may be necessary for the extended family member to have concurrent or temporary custody to allow the family member to provide the needed care more fully and uninhibitedly. The custodial parent chooses whether to give concurrent or temporary custody to the extended family member.

There are many reasons why a caregiving relative may require concurrent custody of a relative’s child. Concurrent custody means giving custody rights to a child alongside the parent or parents of that child, so the extended family member can make important decisions for the child and otherwise meet the child’s needs.

The relative being given concurrent or temporary custody gets the right to consent to, for example, medical and dental care for the child. The relative may also need to access healthcare records for the child and other essential documents for the child. Other things the relative can do with concurrent custody include enrolling the child in school or consenting or withholding consent to school-related activities or programs that require parental consent.

Who Qualifies as an Eligible Extended Family Member?

Under Florida law, an “extended family member” (for the purpose of granting or obtaining concurrent or temporary custody) is anyone who meets either of these two definitions

  • Someone who is related to the parent “within the third degree by blood or marriage.”
  • A stepparent who is married to the child’s parent, with some exceptions.
  • A person who is not related but one who is “fictive kin” under the law, which means someone who is in an “emotionally significant relationship” with “characteristics of a family relationship” with the child.

Call a Brandon, FL Family Lawyer to Petition for Concurrent or Temporary Custody

If you believe you need to have an extended family member to help in taking care of your child, an experienced Brandon family law attorney can assist you in filing a petition to give your family member the concurrent or temporary custody you seek. The law sets out detailed requirements on how to file and have the petition for concurrent or temporary custody processed. You must strictly comply with these rules, or the petition may be rejected or denied. At Carman and Bevington, PA, we have the experience to have your petition granted smoothly. Contact us for a consultation today.